Lichfield Canal Heritage Towpath Trail


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Points of Interest

© 2016 Lichfield & Hatherton Canals Restoration Trust

The original bridge was removed shortly after abandonment and needs to be reconstructed. There is no visible sign of the original bridge.

To the south of the canal BCN cottage 268 is now a private residence.

The old disused Railway Signal Box remains in place by the level crossing.

Access


8.00 Km.

4.97 Mls.

Distance from Catshill

Distance from Huddlesford

5.90 Km.

3.67 Mls.

Access to the Heritage Towpath Trail, just a short distance down to Lock 18.

The level crossing and phone is no longer in use!

Fosseway Lane Bridge

On canal line

Relative Position

Restoration phase

3

Photo: Cottage 268 next to Fosseway Lane crossing. The canal will cross just this side of the car.


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Catshill

Index

Huddlesford

Trail Map 4

A large quantity of spoil from roadworks has been dumped in the canal bed. This will be moved to fill in the ditch alongside the canal route, originally dug out to build the railway embankment.

In January 2017  Paul Reeves carried out some excavations to locate the lost canal towpath.

“After a lot of research and digging....eureka. The towpath emerged from the past after moving about 3 ton of soil and rubble. The good news is we now know where it is, the bad news its 810mm below the surface, although still in reasonable condition. That means the bottom of the canal is at least 2 meters below the built up ground level. I'm probably the first person to see it since the 1960's so pictures attached to show you what I found.”

“The towpath runs parallel to the hedge from the lock but then turns away from the hedge towards the LHCRT sign near the road. The big tree in the picture is on top of the towpath so must be 60 years old, its roots shoot out at the present ground level so hopefully towpath still below.”

Ordinance Survey Map from 1883 of the Fosseway crossing and Lock 16-18 area.

Courtesy National Library of Scotland